Apple II Audio Bootstrapping

Please note that the IIgs, the IIc, and the /// don't have cassette ports, so these procedures will only work on the II, II+, and IIe computers. Also, while DOS ADT runs in 48k, ProDOS ADTPro requires your Apple to have 64k of memory. You can still use the DOS bootstrap procedure here to get DOS going on a 48k Apple.

The goal here is to get the ADTPro client down to the Apple so that you can easily transfer all the rest of the great Apple II software that is available on the Internet. Getting to that goal will take a series of detailed steps. You may be able to save yourself some of those steps, depending on what software you currently have available to you.

Choose a bootstrapping scenario below that matches your situation.

If you still need to connect your host and Apple II computers through their audio and cassette ports, refer back to the Connections section.

If you'd rather have a pre-built ADTPro floppy disk arrive at your door than create one yourself, click here.

Bootstrapping Demonstration Video

Here is a 6-minute overview video of the audio bootstrapping process. It shows the bare-metal bootstrapping scenario of an Apple IIe with audio cables all the way to making a bootable ADTPro floppy:

If you already have ProDOS

  1. Connect the two computers through their audio out and cassette in ports.
  2. Start your Apple with ProDOS booted from floppy (or any bootable partition). The following procedure will write the ADTPro client to the current prefix/directory, so you may want to set that now. If you don't, it will be saved to whatever the current prefix is set to.
  3. On the ADTPro server, push the "Audio" button.
  4. Decide which version of the client you wish to send, and click that menu option. You can send the audio version ("Bootstrapping->ProDOS->Send ADTPro Audio Client"), the serial version ("Bootstrapping->ProDOS->Send ADTPro Serial Client"), or the ethernet version ("Bootstrapping->ProDOS->Send ADTPro Ethernet Client"). You don't have to stick to the same method of communicating with your Apple once you've finished with the initial bootstrapping, but you certainly can if you want to.
  5. A dialog box will come up instructing you to type a set of commands on the Apple. They will be similar to the following:
    • CALL -151 (The Apple should respond with the asterisk (*) prompt.)
    • 800.xxxxR (Note the "0" is a zero, not the letter "O.")

    The second command (800.xxxxR) will instruct the Apple to start listening for data on its cassette-in port. Fill in the real numbers for the four "x" characters above as given in the ADTPro server dialog box. When you hit return on the Apple after this command, the blinking cursor should disappear.

  6. Dismiss the ADTPro server dialog by clicking on the Ok button. That will start the flow of data over the audio/cassete link that the Apple is waiting for. The progress bar will show how far along the transfer is. After the transfer finishes, you should hear a "beep" at the Apple end and be returned to the asterisk prompt (*)
    • Note: If instead the Apple says "ERR" or never returns you to a prompt, either the Apple isn't hearing anything at all (check the audio cable) or it isn't hearing things loudly enough. Make sure your sound volume is set at 50% of maximum and try again. Hit Ctrl-Reset on the Apple to regain control and start again at step 4 above.
  7. Once the transfer completes successfully, start the ADTPro client with the command 800G from the asterisk prompt at the Apple. Or, if you happen to put yourself back at the Applesoft prompt, you can also start the ADTPro client with the CALL 2048 command from Applesoft.
  8. If you need to format a new floppy or two now, go to ADTPro's formatting utility by hitting the F key. You can pick the drive to format from there.
  9. Save ADTPro to your floppy (or any other) drive. Go to ADTPro's configuration screen by hitting the G key and save it to your current drive prefix. See the client configuration section for details on saving ADTPro.
  10. Start transferring 5.25", 3.5", Ram drive, or hard drive images to your heart's content! If you just went through bare-metal bootstrapping, be sure one of the first physical disks you create is a full copy of the ADTPro distribution disk (ADTPRO-2.0.2.DSK). It itself is bootable, so you won't have to go through the manual bootstrapping process any more once you have one of those built (and write-protected).

Starting from bare metal

  1. Connect the two computers through their audio ports. Make sure the volume is turned up on the host computer!
  2. Boot your Apple; hit Ctrl-Reset before it reads anything from the disk drive. It's important that it not load any OS, even DOS 3.3. Put a double sided, double density diskette in the drive and close the door. It doesn't matter if it's formatted or not.
  3. On the ADTPro server, click the big "Audio" button.
  4. On the ADTPro server, click on the "Bootstrapping->ProDOS->Send ProDOS" menu item.
  5. A dialog box will come up instructing you to type a set of commands on the Apple. They will be similar to the following:
    • CALL -151
    • 2000.xxxxR (Note the "0" is a zero, not the letter "O.")

      Back on the Apple... the first command (CALL -151) will place the Apple into its machine language "monitor." That will allow you enter some commands that are not available to you in the Apple's normal BASIC mode.

      The second command (2000.xxxxR) will instruct the Apple to start listening for data on its cassette-in port. Fill in the real numbers for the four "x" characters above as given in the ADTPro server dialog box. When you hit return on the Apple after this command, the blinking cursor should disappear.

  6. Dismiss the ADTPro server dialog by clicking on the Ok button. That will start the flow of data over the audio/cassete link that the Apple is waiting for. The progress bar will show how far along the transfer is. After the transfer finishes, you should hear a "beep" at the Apple end and be returned to the asterisk prompt (*)
    • Note: If instead the Apple says "ERR" or never returns you to a prompt, either the Apple isn't hearing anything at all (check the audio cable) or it isn't hearing things loudly enough. Make sure your sound volume is set at 50% of maximum and try again. Hit Ctrl-Reset on the Apple to regain control and start again at step 4 above.
  7. Once the transfer completes successfully, the kernel of ProDOS is sitting at memory location 2000 on your Apple, and needs to be booted. Back on the Apple, enter the command: 2000G from the asterisk prompt. This first boot stage should leave your screen looking something like this, with the cursor blinking after an asterisk (*) prompt:
  8. Now send a copy of the ADTPro client program to the Apple. You'll use it soon to format floppies and to receive the full, bootable ADTPro distribution diskette at the Apple. On the ADTPro server, click on "Bootstrapping->ProDOS->Send ADTPro Audio Client".
  9. A dialog box will come up instructing you to type a set of commands on the Apple. They will be similar to the following:
    • CALL -151 (You don't actually have to type this one in, since the bootstrapping operation will have left you at the asterisk prompt already. It won't hurt anything if you do, but you don't need to.)
    • 800.xxxxR (Note the "0" is a zero, not the letter "O.")

    In this scenario, you only need to enter the second command (800.xxxxR) at your Apple.

  10. Dismiss the ADTPro server dialog by clicking on the Ok button.
  11. Once the transfer completes successfully, start the ADTPro client with the command 800G from the asterisk prompt at the Apple. Or, if you happen to put yourself back at the Applesoft prompt, you can also start the ADTPro client with the CALL 2048 command from Applesoft.
  12. Use the ADTPro client's format function to format a diskette or two. Note that in the ProDOS world, formatting a diskette doesn't make it bootable - it just prepares the filesystem for writing. The next step of sending the ADTPro distribution diskette will create bootable diskette for you.
  13. You are now ready to receive the ADTPRO-2.0.2.DSK disk image from the host. Once you've done that, you've got a bootable ProDOS diskette that contains all the ADTPro client programs. If you have a 3-1/2" disk drive, you can receive the ADTPRO-2.0.2.PO disk image to get a bootable 3-1/2" disk.

Bootstrapping DOS

If you don't need or want the ADTPro client, or if you just want to get DOS bootstrapped using the audio connection - this procedure's for you. If instead you intend to do ADTPro client and server disk transfers, you really want to do the ProDOS bare-metal bootstrapping procedure above.

The full process looks like this:

  1. Connect the two computers through their audio ports.
  2. Boot your Apple; hit Ctrl-Reset before it reads anything from the disk drive (you don't have any software, right?). Put a double sided, double density diskette in the drive and close the door; it doesn't matter if it's formatted or not.
  3. On the ADTPro server, click the big "Audio" button. Click on the "Bootstrapping->EsDOS ][ ->Send EsDOS ][ part 1" menu item.
  4. A dialog box will come up instructing you to type commands like the following on the Apple:
    • HOME (This is important because a message will appear as part of the transfer, and this command will help prevent it getting pushed off the top of the screen)
    • CALL -151 (The Apple will respond with the asterisk (*) prompt.)
    • 3D0.xxxR (Note the "0" is a zero, not the letter "O.")
  5. Back on the Apple... fill in the real numbers for the three "x" characters above as given. Hit return on the Apple; the blinking cursor should go away.
  6. Dismiss the ADTPro server dialog by clicking on the Ok button. The progress bar will show how far along the transfer is. After the transfer finishes, you should hear a "beep" and be returned to the asterisk prompt (*).
    • If instead it says "ERR" or never returns you to a prompt, either the Apple isn't hearing anything at all (check the audio cable) or it isn't hearing things loudly enough. Make sure your sound volume is set at 50% of maximum and try again. Hit Ctrl-Reset on the Apple to regain control and start again at step 3 above.

    A message will be displayed across the top of the screen for a command you will need soon; just write it down for now:

    • 9D84G (But don't type it in now!)
  7. On the ADTPro server, click on the "Bootstrapping->EsDOS ][ ->Send EsDOS ][ part 2" menu item.
  8. A dialog box will come up instructing you to type more commands at the Apple. The only one you really need to enter if you're already at the asterisk prompt (*) is this:
    • 9D00.BFFFR (Note the "0" is a zero, not the letter "O.")
  9. Enter 9D00.BFFFR on the Apple and hit Return. The blinking cursor should go away.
  10. Dismiss the ADTPro server dialog by clicking on the Ok button. The progress bar will show how far along the transfer is. After the transfer finishes, you should hear a "beep" and be returned to the asterisk prompt (*).
  11. Back on the Apple, enter this command (the one you wrote down just a minute ago):
    • 9D84G
  12. The Apple should change from the asterisk prompt (*) to the Applesoft prompt (]).

    You now have EsDOS II in memory only on your Apple until you format a floppy. Do this now with the INIT command on the Apple: INIT HELLO. Once the INIT operation completes, you now have a bootable DOS diskette.

  13. You might 'init' another floppy now to get a second floppy formatted now that you have a working version of DOS. Remove your EsDOS diskette, insert a blank diskette, and type the command INIT HELLO on the Apple to format it.
  14. Reboot your newly formatted floppy with the PR#6 command (where 6 is the number of the slot your Disk ][ card is in). You're done here if all you want is a bootable diskette.
  15. Remember, DOS ADT can't do audio transfers because it only knows how to communicate over a serial connection. If you want to do audio transfers, you really want to use the ProDOS bare-metal bootstrapping procedure above.
  16. You may wish to create a disk with the DOS version of ADT on it now. With a freshly formatted DOS floppy in the Apple drive, send over the DOS version of ADT to the Apple.
  17. On the ADTPro server, click on "Bootstrapping->EsDOS ][ ->Send DOS ADT Client." The dialog box that pops up will give you commands to like these to type on the Apple. Do them now:
    • CALL -151 (The Apple will respond with the asterisk (*) prompt.)
    • 803.xxxxR (Note the "0" is a zero, not the letter "O.")
  18. Dismiss the ADTPro server dialog by clicking on the Ok button. The progress bar will show how far along the transfer is. After the transfer finishes, you should hear a "beep" and be returned to the asterisk prompt (*).
    • If instead it says "ERR" or never returns you to a prompt, either the Apple isn't hearing anything at all (check the audio cable) or it isn't hearing things loudly enough. Make sure your sound volume is set at 50% of maximum and try again. Hit Ctrl-Reset on the Apple to regain control and start again at step 15 above.
  19. Start the DOS ADT client with the command 803G from the asterisk prompt at the Apple. Go to ADT's configuration menu by hitting the C key. Use the space bar to navigate down to the SAVE CONFIG menu item. Hit an arrow key to change NO to YES and hit Return on the Apple. That will save the DOS ADT client to the floppy drive:
  20. Now boot your DOS ADT floppy. The Apple command BRUN ADT will start the DOS ADT client up once the disk is done booting. Just remember that ADT running under DOS (as opposed to ADTPro running under ProDOS) is not capable of transferring disk images over the audio connection you just used; DOS ADT can only use a serial connection.